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Category:Flute

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Flute, n. Etym: [OE. floute, floite, fr. OF. flaüte, flahute, flahuste, F. fl; cf. LL. flauta, D. fluit. See Flute, v. i.]

1. A musical wind instrument, consisting of a hollow cylinder or pipe, with holes along its length, stopped by the fingers or by keys which are opened by the fingers. The modern flute is closed at the upper end, and blown with the mouth at a lateral hole.
The breathing flute's soft notes are heard around. Pope.

2. (Arch.)

Defn: A channel of curved section; -- usually applied to one of a vertical series of such channels used to decorate columns and pilasters in classical architecture. See Illust. under Base, n.

3. A similar channel or groove made in wood or other material, esp. in plaited cloth, as in a lady's ruffle.

4. A long French breakfast roll. Simonds.

5. A stop in an organ, having a flutelike sound.
Flute bit, a boring tool for piercing ebony, rosewood, and other hard woods.
-- Flute pipe, an organ pipe having a sharp lip or wind-cutter which imparts vibrations to Knight.

flute
Flute, n. Etym: [Cf. F. fl a transport, D. fluit.]

Defn: A kindof flyboat; a storeship. Armed en flûte ( (Nav.), partially armed.

flute
Flute, v. i. Etym: [OE. flouten, floiten, OF. flaüter, fleüter, flouster, F. flûter, cf. D. fluiten; ascribed to an assumed LL. flautare, flatuare, fr. L. flatus a blowing, fr. flare to blow. Cf. Flout, Flageolet, Flatulent.]

Defn: To play on, or as on, a flute; to make a flutelike sound.

flute
Flute, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Fluted; p. pr. & vb. n. Fluting.]

1. To play, whistle, or sing with a clear, soft note, like that of a flute.
Knaves are men, That lute and flute fantastic tenderness. Tennyson.
The redwing flutes his o-ka-lee. Emerson.

2. To form flutes or channels in, as in a column, a ruffle, etc.


---excerpt from the Illustrated Bible Dictionary.

Flute - A musical wind instrument, probably composed of a number of pipes, mentioned Daniel 3:5, Daniel 3:7, Daniel 3:10, Daniel 3:15. In Matthew 9:23, Matthew 9:24, notice is taken of players on the flute, here called "minstrels" (but in R.V. "flute-players"). Flutes were in common use among the ancient Egyptians.

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